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So I had AA come out and look for the fault that was causing jerky running it's coming up as fault P0132 sporadic O2 bank 1 sensor 1 high voltage.
I've read a few bits does that mean I can change 1 sensor or change both to cure the problem???
Or is there anything I can do without changing them.
 

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So I had AA come out and look for the fault that was causing jerky running it's coming up as fault P0132 sporadic O2 bank 1 sensor 1 high voltage.
I've read a few bits does that mean I can change 1 sensor or change both to cure the problem???
Or is there anything I can do without changing them.

I really would change both.


The second sensor is often dragged down by the first, So, you change the second sensor which immediately fails as the fault was in the first one which never 'threw a code'.


They are a ten minute job to change but are not cheap although GSF or EuroCarParts often include them in their 'parts offers'.
 

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This is interesting. I've always had the impression that sensors are fitted in order to alert the driver that something is wrong... like poor air quality, or weak charge from the alternator etc etc. And they would send a signal to light up the appropriate dash light.
The sensors themselves failing isn't a problem I've encountered myself.. Yet.
 

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I have changed countless Lambda sensors over the years and it only take a bit of dirt (they are virtually impossible to clean successfully) or the sensor wire going out of spec to throw a code. Equally given the 'hostile' environment in which they work vibration or simple connection failure will cause a sensor to fall over.


Sensors that are failing tend to read lean, which causes the fuel system to run overly rich to compensate. The result is increased emissions and fuel consumption and an even worse contaminated sensor.


If P0132 is the only code shown then the sensor has failed/ is failing
 

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Also a tip from "Wheeler Dealer" Ed said "when fitting a new sensor DON'T touch the face as this can cause a false reading, bit like when fitting a new light bulb, don't touch the glass.
 

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I see, so the blighters really can cause some problems with rough running.
I'll keep that in mind for the future.

They surely can!


First car that I had with Lambda sensors was a Volvo 240 - the dealer had no clue about them as Lambda sensors were relatively 'new tech' on Volvos but the car kept going into limp mode.


Volvo replaced them under warranty (thankfully as they were over £200 each back in 1981) and the problem disappeared - never did find the reason that they failed though.
 

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In all the time that Catalysts and Lambda sensors have been fitted to cars I have only encountered 3 people who have had trouble.

First was our Vet, bought a new Monaro (it was actually 2 years old and had been sitting in the yard at the dealers) had square tyres and the engine light on. Both sensors had to be replaced which was just before it was wiped out by a stolen car at a junction.

2nd was an apprentice at work. 12 year old Mk 1 Corsa 1.0, failed MOT on catalyst £350 to fix.

3rd was a chap at work whose issue was diagnosed as a faulty sensor. A week after replacing light was on again and the diagnostics confirmed it was the same sensor again, garage replaced FOC. Then a week or so later the light was on again and they washed their hands of the problem saying it was nothing to do with them. On advice he went to the main dealer whose diagnostics identified the same sensor and their superior knowledge instantly diagnosed the issue. The back street indy had used silicone on the sensor threads and silicone is not compatible with sensors. Special sealants are available but should not be needed since the sensor has a crushable washer.
 

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A tiny bit of silicone sealant migrating onto the sensor would have screwed it but, as you say, sealant shouldn't be needed in the first place and who the heck would use silicone on what is essentially and exhaust component?
 
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