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Discussion Starter #1
I own a note E11 from 2010 since 2015. It is the most expensive car in maintenance I ever owned. One can not do anything one selves but clean the vehicle. It drives very uncomfortable with bad rearview and side views with distorted window view. Nevertheless I made 70.000 KMS on European roads because I have no other car. In fact this is is nothing less then a British Renault with a Nissan logo. And it notes. Plus is you can transport a lot moving especially if you have the family pack. Against my 1982 Mazda 323 and Mitsubishi Lancer evo 2 from 1995 she is as a poor match worse then the Austin allegro I once owned. Would I buy one again. From all cars in history I owned: NO. A dealers money making scheme...
 

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Hi Rob, welcome to the forum.
It's accepted that the E11 note can be a stinker if you get the 'Friday afternoon' production.
However, as you say it takes plenty of luggage and family for it's small size.
Also because low income citizens (like me) need something low priced, it does provide overall cheap transport. When i can afford my new Mercedes I'll no doubt give my E12 note away free to a needy family but until that time I'll happily drive it around at 60mpg (96km's) and just fix it when it breaks.
As for the Austin Allegro.. Urghh! The most horrid British car in history. I hope you had the early square steering wheel mate!
There are more reliable cars around, but that is down to choice and available funds ☺
 

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Well you've still got it after 5 years of ownership. so it can't be all that bad. It's pointless comparing it to older cars, as pretty much all cars in this catagory/class are all built to a budget. I have done almost 250, 000 in 11 years of ownership, and have spent the best of part of £1300 on replacing parts that are not OEM. Most of those were rubber suspension bushings, plus repairs to broken wires, heater blower. So on average £130 a year is damned good, as far as I'm concerned. This does not include service parts, cam belt/water pump replacement.

Yes it's a Renault in part, but who cares. In 10 years it has never broken down, or missed a beat.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doing a whole lot worse down here. Spending thousands a year on maintenance. The Austin was a lot easier to maintain, apart of its rare suspension units. A SU carburettor was a simple device. The mazda had quite a few childhood diseases but was very reliable and easy to maintain, even in the dark. A Lancer basically needs no maintenance virtually. A Nissan note is indeed a stinker and by no means a cheap car to run. Can't even change a lightbulb on your own or adjust her idle. You need a laptop to do this. It is a dealers car.
 

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All cars are dealers cars., unless you can afford £10 of 000's for software and hardware. You need a laptop for all cars today........all car systems are computer managed now. You keep harking back to the old days. Yes, I agree they were a whole more simple to look after then. A handfull of spanners and hammer....Job done. BUT, unless you buy a classc old car, you're stuck.

You would have been better buying another car than spending 1000's on it. Get rid or get on with it.!!
 

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Oh yes! I can well remember the good old days when a driver could open the cars bonnet and have acres of space to change a light bulb with the rear wheel drive engines (mounted in line in my Rover 2000 and that WAS a good car) or the piddly little orrible cast iron 1300 Austin transverse lump mounted in a Square box compartment.
I can also well remember so many freezing damp winter mornings when you went to turn the key in fear as the battery got slower and slower and then.. dead!
You would take off the distributor cap and with numb fingers wipe the moisture out expectantly.
Some mornings you were treated to seeing 'fresh' moisture forming in the cap just as you were going to refit it. Do i want another Austin?
I'd rather fry my testiments in hot oil.
It's time, Robert to get shot of your Note and get another Mazda. Yes they are reliable but as Boysie indicates correctly, you'll still face big bills for any diagnostics and even changing a light bulb... They nearly always fit them tight in the transverse areo dynamic jelly mould shape these days.
 

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I bought a Peugot 405 estate from an Auction 1.8 turbo diesel, over 450, 000 miles on it. Front suspension requires a rebuild, dampers, springs, T.R ends, strut top mounts.........by the time I'd finshed I had spent as much as it cost to buy it. Was it worth it. HELL YES.!!.......... It never gave me the slightest bother for a car that was 16 years old when I bought it. Galvanised body and chassis, engine never missed a beat, and alway gave over 40 mpg whatever speed I was doing. Driving to Scotland was a pleasure in the old girl, and managed to sneak a crafty 100 miles an hour when the bill wasn't looking.
And to top it off, when I sold it I made over £70 profit after owning it for just over a 18 months.
That was one car I regret selling, but I couldn't bring 3 cars to Ireland.
I'm pretty sure it will still be going if I had it, except for the anti diesel governments would have 'road taxed' it out of existence.
 

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or the piddly little orrible cast iron 1300 Austin transverse lump
You refer to the A Series engine that was manufactured from 1951 to 2000. Think that proves it was a worthless dog.

But did you know it was also manufactured under license by several companies most notably Nissan (ever heard of them?) who developed it and it ultimately became the basis for the 1.8 litre Turbo used in the Sylvia (probably no interchangeable parts and it won't fit in a Mini).
 

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Datsun in those days, wasn't it. My mate worked for a Datsun Dealership as a mechanic. He recognised the 'A' series straight away.:ROFLMAO:

Was it a Datsun 100a.??
 

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I'd say it was a good engine in 1951. I remember as a child the characteristic 'whine' of an oncoming Austin/Morris 1100 and 1300. But well past it's best by year 2000.
I didn't know that Datsun took up some of the design, but i can vouch that my Datsun violet was a far better car than anything coming out of Longbridge in the 80's.
Smooth as silk and it just kept going. It would be worth a fortune now as there are only a couple left in the UK.
Datsun enjoyed good reliability back then cos i never had any issues with mine and i guess many people loved their sunny 120's too.
Corrosion was their only killer from memory.
 

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I'd say it was a good engine in 1951. I remember as a child the characteristic 'whine' of an oncoming Austin/Morris 1100 and 1300. But well past it's best by year 2000.
Don't forget that it won rallies in the 60's and despite Leylands best efforts to replace it none of the projects ever came to fruition. Leyland did of course bring out newer engines over the years but only one outlived the A series and that was the K series used in the Metro and Rover 200/400 models and their developments.

The A series only lived until the Mini died and that was only because nothing else would fit within Issigonis's design. It was threatened in the 80's when un-leaded petrol was due to replace the leaded stuff and engineers said it would be impossible to modify it them they found a way. Then the catalyst threatened it but they simply injected the engine and it lived a bit longer.

The A series is still being used in the Davis Brown Mini Remastered but at that price they can keep it.
 

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Yes it was a tough rough unit.
I used to take off the cast iron cylinder head and regrind the valve seatings with a wooden stick and paste. I could fit that job into a Saturday morning before lunch. I believe the 1.8 K series had a tendancy to blow their head gaskets, particularly when fitted in early Freelanders.
Happy days, but now I'll stick to my allotment.. Much less stress than tinkering with cars.
 

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I did quite a number on 1275 A series, well not me exactly, had it bored to 1293, crankshaft tuftrided after regrinding,(I couldn't afford a billet steel crankshaft), lightened, powermax pistons and conrods, lightened and polished steel rocker assembly, double valve springs, tuftrided road/rally camshaft, duplex tiiming chain, lightened flywheel, uprated clutch assembly, all dynamically balanced, total head reworking with larger valves, polished and ported, single 45 DCOE weber on a ported and polished and matched heated mainifold, plus an adjustable dual throttle cable. Coupled with a Cooper S gearbox.........can't remember what the final drive was., not an LSD,. Uprated oil and water pump. Oil cooler fitted. Leccy fan fitted to a standard 1300 radiator. Front crank damper belt drive.
Block was pickled and washed for 48 hours, and had all new gallery plugs renewed.

All this was sat in a Mini Countryman, on 5 inch alloys with Dunlop supersport tyres, complete with a straight through 50mm exhaust with a Ford Transit resonator box.

Sh*t off shovel didn't do it justice. 22mpg around town, 47mpg on long runs.

Dyno tested at 119 hp at the flywheel. 3 months later the centre bearing went into meltdown, because of crank whip. Crankshaft was straight, so another regrind and a tuftriding. Fitted a steel centre main bearing strap and better bearing shells. Rebalanced again. Dyno tested again, 122 at the flywheel. No idea where the extra 3hp came from.

There was a mate of mate who had a full race cam in his, plus split 48 dcoe split webbers, he lost me in a cloud of dust, the swine. But he eventually totally blew his engine.

I sold my 1966 Mini Countryman for £1775, which was what the engine was worth, so the car was essentailly free, but that cost me £85 from my in laws. Oh happy days.(y):D:D
 

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My 1965 countryman was white and had a standard 998cc engine. Third party fire and theft insurance was £30 per year (with what was Norwich Union).. c 1975
It rusted so badly around the front headlights that one day on my way home from work, the o/s front lamp fell out and was hanging from it's wiring like a grotesque eyeball.
I bought a whole new plastic front end for that mini.
Once I'd been to the scrappers and got some 4.5J wheels for it and new radials i could whip it round corners at 50mph.
With cross plys I'd have been down the ditch 😁.
 

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Ah crossply tyres, who remembers the little black circles of bite yer ass if you push me too hard ?
Glad we don't have them now.
 

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I put 2 new wings on, and a pair of hinge panels. I gave the whole motor a coat of hand applied coach paint. Did the roof with a roller. I was amazed how good it looked........from 50 feet.:D

Nah, it didn't look too bad though. The next door neighbour moved in a year on, and he must have took pity on my Mini, as he asked if I wanted him to do a respray. £40 changed hands, but I had to do the prep. Sorted.(y):ROFLMAO:
 
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